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Bachelor Of Science in Business Administration

Software Engineering Program

General Information

Goal & Objectives

Career Opportunities

Learning Outcomes

Curriculum

Course Descriptions

General Information

Software plays a critical role in today’s technology-driven environment. Software engineers are the captains of the innovation ship in a variety of industries and areas. By introducing students to the phases of the software life cycle, our program prepares them for careers in a variety of fields, including Object-Oriented Analysis and Design, Human-Computer Interaction, Software Quality Assurance, Software Design & Architecture, and Database Systems. Our graduates, with their developed critical thinking and strong teamwork abilities, are capable of solving engineering challenges through the application of theories.
Software is evolving and developing in a wide variety of industries, and has become the primary driver of future development. Software complexity is increasing in today’s contexts with fast changing demands.

Goal & Objectives

The goals and objectives are classified into three broad categories:

Technical: Software engineers are constantly looking to enhance their technical abilities. That is self-evident.
Soft skills: While coding is a significant element of software engineering, an engineer cannot rely solely on coding. Additionally, they must be able to explain their case, share their learning accomplishments, and communicate with their team and stakeholders, among other things. This will ultimately determine your leveling up. Soft skills are just as critical as technical abilities. With behavior, a different set of abilities and experiences are required, and the individual must practice diligently in order to enhance their tactics, skills, and strategies, particularly in relation to their team.
Business-related: Another critical component is recognizing and comprehending how you contribute value to the firm where you work.

Career Opportunities

Software engineering is a subfield of computer science that deals with the design and development of software for computer systems and applications. Software engineering is comprised of three major components: knowledge of programming languages, software development, and computer operating systems. Software engineering is a closely related but distinct occupational discipline from computer hardware engineering, which is concerned with the design and development of hardware and computing technologies.

Several significant fields and job pathways in software engineering include the following: applications development, systems development, web development, embedded systems development, software testing editors, database administrators, and system programmer, who can be either a programmer or an analyst. A degree in this discipline can also help you discover positions such as an IT consultant, an IT technical support officer, or an IT sales professional.

Jobs

The software is changing and innovating in many different industries and is becoming the main driving force for future development. In today’s environments with rapidly changing demands, software complexity is increasing.

The goals and objective are divided into the following three main categories:
1. Technical: Software engineers always want to improve their technical skills. That is a no-brainer.
2. Soft skills: Although coding is the major part of software engineering, an engineer cannot just code. They also need to be able to argue their case, share learning achievements, communicate with their team and stakeholder etc. Ultimately this will determine you levelling up. Soft skills are as important as technical skills. With behaviour it takes a different type of skillset and experiences where the individual needs to practice it well to improve their tactics, skills and techniques mainly around their team.
3. Business related: It is another important part that realizing and understanding how you are adding value to the company you are working at.

Learning Outcomes

Program graduates will be equipped with all the knowledge, skills and competencies that comprise the program learning outcomes (PLOs) to successfully join the software engineering field.

Upon completion of the undergraduate degree program in software engineering, students will be able to:

1. Identifying theoretical and practical aspects of core knowledge areas in computer technology and computer usage, computer science, and mathematics.
2. Solving engineering problems; selecting and applying proper analysis and modelling techniques.
3. Analyzing, specifying, and designing quality computer solutions.
4. Applying theoretical and practical knowledge of different knowledge areas to engineering problems.
5. Conducting research in different areas including operating systems, analysis of algorithms, databases, computer security, parallel and distributed computation, Web and Internet engineering, etc.
6. Applying problem-solving skills to solve real problems and using engineering design to produce solutions that meet specified needs.
7. Discussing the ethical, social and legal effects of using technology in the context of societies.
8. Communicating, orally and in written form, with the level of sophistication needed for academic studies.
9. Creating a collaborative and inclusive environment that incorporates both individual and teamwork skills.

Curriculum

Course Descriptions

ENGL101 Academic English I

ENGL101 is a compulsory course for freshman students. ENGL101 focuses on the cognitive skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking. The course uses current reading and listening texts and focuses on how to understand relevant parts of a text, how to read quickly and effectively, how to relate different ideas from multiple texts and how to use texts as sources for an output task. In speaking and writing, the course focuses on using sources, paraphrasing, quoting, summarizing and synthesizing. The students will learn how to write coherent, concise, informative or persuasive responses to writing questions supporting their point of view.

MATH141 Basic Mathematics

This course introduces mathematics and especially shows how mathematics is applied to solve fundamental engineering problems. Its aim is to show the students why mathematics is important in an engineering career by demonstrating how simple engineering problems can be mathematically described and methodically analyzed to find a solution.

Course Textbook:

1. Adams R. A., & Essex C. (2010). Calculus, 7th Edition, Pearson.

2. Bird J. (2010)a. Basic Engineering Mathematics, 5th Edition, Newnes.

3. Bird J. (2010)b. Higher Engineering Mathematics, 6th Edition, Newnes.

SOFE101 Basic Computer Technologies I

Basic concepts of information technology, learn how to use with Microsoft Office tools: MS Word, MS Excel, and MS PowerPoint. Google Applications, Internet and Social Networks, Social Media, and Operation Systems.

Course Textbook:

Catherine LaBerta (2012). Computers Are Your Future. Prentice Hall.

SOFE103 Introduction to Programming I

The main aim of this course is to provide students with an introductory overview into the Computer Science and programming. Giving the student an initial base in the C++ development world, with an emphasis on learning basic programming principles, ranging from I/O operations, variable management, using flow control capabilities and also using arrays. At the end of this course the students should be able to write procedural programs using build in data types and arrays of these data types.

Course Textbook:

1. Malik, D. S. (2014). C++ programming: Program design including data structures. Nelson Education.

2. Deitel, P., & Deitel, H. (2016). C++ how to Program. Pearson.

SOFE105 Web Design

The aim of this course is to learn about the fundamentals of designing websites. Design issues in the functionality, usability, and content of web pages are solved. By means of lectures and lab sessions, students will learn how to make their own website portfolio.

Course Textbook:

1. Duckett, J. (2011). HTML & CSS: design and build websites (Vol. 15). Indianapolis, IN: Wiley.

2. Sebesta, R. W. (2008). Programming the world wide web. Pearson Addison Wesley.

TURK101 Turkish I

This course provides an orientation to modern Turkish language for foreign students who wish to communicate in this language for their needs. Basic grammar and sentence structure forms in Turkish are practiced. The required grammar and vocabulary will also be developed through their adaptation to daily situations in contexts such as introducing yourselves, greeting, talking about the things they possess by using possessive adjectives, forming positive, negative and question sentences by using present simple, telling the time, talking about their own timetables, using demonstrative pronouns when describing the place of objects and becoming familiar with vocabulary related to family members.

ENGL102 Academic English II

ENG 102 is a compulsory course for freshman students. ENG 102 focuses on the cognitive skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking. The course uses current reading and listening texts and focuses on how to understand relevant parts of a text, how to read quickly and effectively, how to relate different ideas from multiple texts and how to use texts as sources for an output task. In speaking and writing, the course focuses on using sources, paraphrasing, quoting, summarizing and synthesizing. The students will learn how to write coherent, concise, informative or persuasive responses to writing questions supporting their point of view.

MATH142 Calculus I

Functions, limit, continuity and derivative. Mean Value Theorem and applications. Definite and indefinite integrals. Logarithmic, exponential, hyperbolic and inverse trigonometric functions. L’Hopital’s Rule. Integration techniques. Area, volume and rotational surface area calculation.

Course Textbook:

1. Adams R. A., & Essex C. (2010). Calculus, 7th Edition, Pearson.

2. Bird J. (2010)a. Basic Engineering Mathematics, 5th Edition, Newnes.

3. Bird J. (2010)b. Higher Engineering Mathematics, 6th Edition, Newnes.

SOFE102 Basic Computer Technologies II

Students will learn about fundamental concepts of information technology. Students learn how to use with Microsoft Office tools with the aim of applying these skills in their freshman year. They are also able to continue to use these skills during their undergraduate studies and even after graduation.

Course Textbook:

Catherine LaBerta (2012). Computers Are Your Future. Prentice Hall.

SOFE104 Introduction to Programming II

The main aim of this course is to provide students with an advanced overview into the computer science and programming. Giving the student the fundamental base in the C++ development world, with an emphasis on learning advanced programming principles, ranging from functions, arrays, application of arrays, structs, classes, pointers. At the end of this course the students should be able to write complicated programs.

Course Textbook:

1. Malik, D. S. (2014). C++ programming: Program design including data structures. Nelson Education.

2. Deitel, P., & Deitel, H. (2016). C++ how to Program. Pearson.

MATH144 Discrete Mathematics

It is the course for mathematics, computer science and engineering majors. The aim of this course is to show mathematical techniques that is used to study discrete processes rather than continuous. Discrete mathematics is prerequisite of logic design, mathematical modeling, operational research, cryptography, software development, computer algorithms courses.

Course Textbook:

1. Goodaire, E. G., & Parmenter, M. M. (2001). Discrete mathematics with graph theory. Prentice Hall PTR.

2. Grimaldi, R. P. (2006). Discrete and Combinatorial Mathematics. Pearson.

MATH241 Linear Algebra

The main subjects of the course are the vector and matrix operations, linear transformations, determinants, linear independence and dependence of vectors, linear vector spaces and subspaces, dimensions and basis vectors for vector spaces, eigenvalues eigenvectors analysis and diagonalization, solution methods for first order and second order ordinary differential equations.

Course Textbook:

Howard Anton, Chris Rorres. (2015) Elementary Linear Algebra with applications. John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

SOFE201 Programming Languages C#

Programming rules in visual and net environment, the general structure of C#, I/O operations, data types, variables, standard operations, selection statements, loops, array, user-defined data types, subprograms, and writing methods.

Course Textbook:

C# Programming: From Problem Analysis to Program Design, Barbara Doyle, Cengage Learning.

SOFE203 Algorithms and Data Structures

Data structures and their usage. Programming methods, different types of searching and sorting algorithms with their applications, space and time complexities. Linked lists. Recursion method. Trees and tree searching algorithms. Stacks and queues with their applications.

Course Textbook:

1. Deitel, P., & Deitel, H. (2016). C++ how to Program. Pearson.

2. Y. Langsam, M. Augenstein, A. Tenenbaum. Data Structures using C and C++, 2nd ed. Prentice Hall, 1996.

SOFE205 Operating Systems

Fundamental concepts of operating systems: usage areas, functions and properties. CPU scheduling, deadlocks. Resource allocation and resource organization. Management of main and virtual memory. Scheduling and Synchronization. Interrupts and their control. File systems and Input/output. Threats and security.

Course Textbook:

Abraham Silberscharz, Galvin, Gagne, Operating System Concepts, Eighth Edition, John Wiley & Sons, 2010.

MATH242 Probability and Statistics

This course gives the student understanding of the main statistical concepts. Basic probability models, random variables. Frequency distribution, measures of central tendency, measures of dispersion, discrete and continuous probability distributions, and the concept of linear regression.

Course Textbook:

1. Theory and Problems of Statistics, 2nd Edition, Murray R. Spiegel, McGraw Hill, Schaum’s Outline Series, 1992.

2. Miller and Freund’s Probability and Statistics for Engineers, 5th Edition, R.A. Johnson, Prentice Hall International Edition, 1994.

SOFE202 Software Engineering Analysis and Design

Definition and properties of Algorithms. Writing Pseudo code. Design and analysis of Algorithms. Data abstraction. Growth of functions, asymptotic notations, complexity of algorithms. Recursive algorithms. Algorithm design paradigm. Computation models.

Course Textbook:

1. Robert L. Kruse, Alexander J. Ryba. Data Structures and Program Design in C++. Prentice Hall.

2. Frank M. Carrano, Janet J. Prichard. Data Abstraction and Problem Solving with C++. Addison Wesley.

3. Mark A. Weiss. Data Structures and Algorithm Design in C++. Addison Wesley.

SOFE305 Database Systems

The fundamental concepts of database management. Data organization, data integrity, and data storing methods. Hierarchical, relational and object-oriented models. Synchronous tasks and their design. Data models (E-R diagrams). Logical database design. Relational algebra. Query languages (SQL).

Course Textbook:

1. Fundamentals of Database Systems, Elmasri & Navathe, Addison-Wesley.

2. Database Systems, Concepts, Languages and Architectures, Paolo Atzeni, Stefano Ceri, Stefano Paraboschi, and Riccardo Torlone, Published by McGraw-Hill, ISBN:0077095006

SOFE204 Object Oriented Programming

Review of C++ programing, File Processing, Stream Input / Output, Classes and Objects, Inheritance, Operator and Function Overloading, Object Oriented Programming, Information Hiding, Polymorphism, Templates, Exception Handling.

Course Textbook:

Deitel, P., & Deitel, H. (2016). C++ how to Program. Pearson.

SOFE206 Computer Networks and Communication

Learning about communication protocols, communication model, and communication tasks. Network structures, architectures and protocols, etc. Types of links, transmission. LANs, MANs and WANs.

Course Textbook:

Stallings W., Data and Computer Communications”, 8th Ed., Prentice-Hall, 2007.

SOFE301 Software Project Management

This course is for the students who know about programming languages and basic concepts of software engineering. The aim of this course is to learn about, Identifying project purpose, project feasibility, project and product scope.

SOFE304 Introduction to Cloud Computing

Introduction to cloud computing, defining cloud computing and its characteristics, cloud architecture and service models/types, distributed storage, benefits of cloud computing, security, cloud services and software, cloud standards.

Course Textbook:

1. Judith Hurwitz, Robin Bloor, Marcia Kaufman, Fern Halper. (2010) Cloud Computing For Dummies, Wiley Pub.

2. Thomas Erl; Zaigham Mahmood, Ricardo Puttini. (2013) Cloud Computing: Concepts, Technology & Architecture, Prentice Hall.

SOFE303 Linux Utilities and Shell Scripting

Fundamental concepts of Linux/UNIX operating systems. Programming the operating system commands and scripts, become familiar with the UNIX environment, Linux/UNIX file system, text editing, shell programming, filename generation, pipes, redirecting input and output. This course requires an understanding of operating systems and programming basics.

Course Textbook:

Steve Will, (2016) Linux for Beginners: The Ultimate Beginner Guide to Linux Command Line, Linux Programming and Linux Operating System.

SOFE306 Software Architecture

The main topics to be covered: Introduction to software architecture and design, fundamental principles for architectural styles, patterns and frameworks, software architecture business cycle, quality attributes in software architecture, and software architecture process. The way that components of software are arranged such as classes, functions, subroutines and the interactions between them.

Course Textbook:

Mark Richards; Neal Ford (2020), Fundamentals of Software Architecture: An Engineering Approach. O’Reilly Media.

SOFE302 Human Computer Interaction

The course content is composed of human computer interaction fundamentals, making interactive systems natural, user modeling in user-centered system design, the user-centered system design process, task analysis, requirements gathering, storyboarding and prototyping, cognitive physiology, the model human processor, advancing simplistic theories, theories of human perception, observational evaluation and protocol analysis, experiments.

Course Textbook:

1. Alan Dix; et al. (2004) Human-computer interaction, Pearson.

2. Rosson, M. & Carroll, J. Usability Engineering: Scenario-Based Development of Human-Computer Interaction.

3. Nielsen, J. Usability engineering, AP.

SOFE405 Wireless Communications

Basic topics in wireless communications for data, multimedia, and voice. Current wireless systems and standards. Issues in physical layer, data-link layer, network layer. Evolution of wireless communications and standards. The course concludes with a brief overview of ad hoc network design, wireless sensor network, and the evolution of cell phones.

Course Textbook:

David Tse, Pramod Viswanath. (2005). Fundamentals of Wireless Communication. Cambridge University Press.

SOFE401 Non-Technical Aspects of Engineering

Engineering ethics and its standards, how to manage a project, risk and change management, creativity, entrepreneurship, legal consequences of engineering solutions; current and future issues in engineering, global and social effects of engineering practices on health, environment and safety, sustainable development, life-long learning.

Course Textbook:

Stuart G. Walesh. (2012). Engineering Your Future: The Professional Practice of Engineering, Third Edition. Wiley.

SOFE403 Software Measurement and Testing

Step by step description of the software metrics, the important phases of testing, highlighting the importance of each phase. This course also covers some concepts such as: software cost estimation, software resource, product, and process measurement.

Course textbook:

1. N.E. Fenton and S.L. Pfleeger. Software Metrics: A Rigorous and Practical Approach (2nd ed.)

2. Stephen H. Kan. Metrics and Models in Software Quality Engineering (2nd ed.)

SOFE309 Mobile Application Development

This course covers the principals behind Mobile devices, mobile applications and their requirements, current mobile platform, storing and retrieving data, developing mobile applications, web services and databases in mobile application, graphics. Mobile applications for Android devices: Material design, graphics, security, data storage, services.

Course Textbook:

1. Bill Phillips, Chris Stewart, Brian Hardy, and Kristin Marsicano, Android Programming: The

Big Nerd Ranch Guide, Big Nerd Ranch LLC, 3rd edition, 2017.

2. Wei-Meng Lee, Beginning Android™ 4 Application Development, 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Indianapolis, Indiana, ISBN: 978-1-118-19954-1

SOFE407 Senior Project I

To acquaint students with the design, analysis and development of a project by teams of students via engineering techniques; preparation of project reports and presentation.

SOFE402 Ethics in Engineering

This is a final year course with the aim of teaching responsibilities and moral rights of engineers in relation to society, clients, and colleagues. Analysis and examination of ethical and value conflict in modern engineering practice. Emphasis on intellectual property rights and conflicting interests. Ethical aspects in engineering design, manufacturing, and operations. Considering Cost-benefit-risk analysis and safety and occupational hazard.

Course textbook:

Seebauer, Edmund Gerard; Barry, Robert Laurence. (2001) Fundamentals of ethics for scientists and engineers. Oxford University Press.

SOFE418 Capstone Project

The main objective of this course is for the students to apply their theoretical knowledge to a real project including real data in a realistic setting. Students learn about the whole process of real project, from collecting and processing data to applying proper analytic methods to the problem. Depending on complexity of project, students can work either individually or in small teams.

SOFE406 Automata Theory

The following topics will be covered: Chomsky hierarchy, automata and formal languages, finite and pushdown automata, Turing machines. Regular expressions, Context free languages and grammars, Context sensitive languages and grammars. Normal structured grammars. Turing machines and their usage.

Complexity of problems.

Course textbook:

J.E. Hopcroft, J. D. Ullman, Introduction to Automata Theory, Languages and Computation, Addison Wesley 1979.

SOFE307 Internet based programming

Fundamental programming knowledge of dynamic web page. Learn about design and construct server-side and client-side components. Learn about programming using Java, JavaScript, and PHP.

Course textbook:

1. Duckett, J. (2014). JavaScript and JQuery: Interactive Front-End Web Development.

2. Duckett, J. (2011). HTML & CSS: design and build websites (Vol. 15). Indianapolis, IN: Wiley.

SOFE310 MS C# Laboratory

The course content is composed of .NET Framework, an object oriented programming overview, file operations, Windows forms, form controls (Label, Textbox, Checkbox, Listbox, Groupbox, etc.), multi-forms, dynamic controls, designing own user controls, abstract classes, inheritance.

Course Textbook:

C# Programming: From Problem Analysis to Program Design, Barbara Doyle, Cengage Learning.

SOFE308 Computing Systems

Preliminaries of computer systems such as software-hardware interface, architecture of computer, and operating systems. Emphasizes on computer system abstraction and required techniques to support them. Dynamic resource management, isolation, naming, and optimization.

Course Textbook:

Noam Nisan and Shimon Shocken. The Elements of Computing Systems. (2008), MIT Press. ISBN13-978-0-262-64068-8.

SOFE404 E-Business: Administration, Security and Marketing

Learn about different business models, e-business strategy framework Inform students about the issues and considerations that are involved in e-business, the overall management of an e-business site.

Course Textbook:

1. Efraim Turban, David King. Electronic Commerce 2012 Global Edition. (2012)

2. Turban, King, Mckay, Marshall, Lee, Viehland. Electronic Commerce: A managerial perspective. (2008)

ENGL201 Occupational English I

ENGL201 is an Occupational English course for students at the Faculty of Engineering. The course aims to introduce a range of skills, including oral skills, research skills, and study skills. Throughout the course, the students will be involved in project work intended to help them in their immediate and future professional life. This will include library research and an oral presentation. By investigating a topic related to Software engineering, students will develop their understanding of independent research skills. The oral presentation aims to enhance spoken fluency and accuracy and provide training in the components of a good presentation.

ENGL202 Occupational English II

ENGL202 is an Occupational English course for students at the Faculty of Engineering. The course aims to introduce a range of skills, including effective academic and professional written communication skills. Throughout the course, the students will be involved in project work intended to help them in their future academic and professional life. This will include library research, technical report writing, and an oral presentation. During the report writing process, students will improve their writing and develop the ability to produce organized cohesive work. The oral presentation aims to enhance the spoken fluency and accuracy necessary for a good presentation.

SOFE409 Database Management Systems

Learning data modelling techniques such as: Entity Relationship Model, UML’s Use Case and Class diagrams. Data definition and creating database objects by using SQL language. Data security and data integrity.

Course Textbook:

1. Fundamentals of Database Systems, Elmasri & Navathe, Addison-Wesley.

2. Database Systems, Concepts, Languages and Architectures, Paolo Atzeni, Stefano Ceri, Stefano Paraboschi, and Riccardo Torlone, Published by McGraw-Hill, ISBN:0077095006

SOFE411 Artificial Intelligence

Learn Introduction to Artificial Intelligence (AI) its concepts and terms, the main topics such as: problem solving, reasoning and planning in AI, machine learning, uncertainty and probability theory, Bayesian networks, and fuzzy logic.

Course Textbook:

S. Russell and P. Norvig. Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach. 3rd edition. Prentice Hall

SOFE413 Data Mining

Overview of data mining. Mining frequent patterns and associations. Implementation techniques. Classification. Cluster analysis.

Course Textbook:

1. Jiawei Han, Micheline Kamber, and Jian Pei. Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques (3rd ed.). Morgan Kaufmann, 2012. ISBN: 9780123814807.

2. Ian H. Witten, Eibe Frank, Data Mining: Practical Machine Learning Tools and Techniques, Morgan Kaufmann, 1999 and 2nd Edition (2005).

SOFE408 Information and Network Security

Basic concepts in cryptography and computer security. Symmetric-key encryption: Block ciphers, One time pad and stream ciphers. Public key cryptography: Cryptography using arithmetic modulo primes, Public key encryption. IDEA, Blowfish. AKS and RSA algorithm, etc.

Course Textbook:

1. William Stallings, Cryptography and Network Security, 3rd Edition, Prentice Hall, 2003.

2. Delfs, H., Introduction to Cryptography, 3rd Edition, 2015

SOFE410 Object-Oriented Systems Analysis and Design

Advanced concepts of object oriented programming. How to produce object models in details and design from system requirements. To show the analysis and design ideas Unified Modeling Language (UML) will be used. Expand the analysis into a design.

Course Textbook:

1. Software Engineering in C, Peter A. Darnell, Philip E. Margolis, Springer Verlag, 1988.

2. Bahrami, Ali. Object Oriented Systems Development. (1998). Boston, Massachusetts: The McGraw-Hill Companies, Incorporated.

SOFE412 Modelling with Petri Nets

This course covers fundamental concepts in Petri net. Behavioral and structural properties. Finite state machines’ modeling. High level Petri nets: colored and hierarchical Petri nets. Specification, validation, simulation of discrete event systems.

Course Textbook:

1. James Peterson. Petri Net Theory and Modelling of Systems, Prentice-Hall.

2. Wolfgang Reisig (auth.) Understanding Petri Nets: Modeling Techniques, Analysis Methods, Case Studies. Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg (2013).

SOFE414 Computational Intelligence

This course is about: Introduction of computational intelligence, foundations of computational intelligence, neural networks, fuzzy sets and fuzzy logic, computational intelligence, metrics and analysis, evolutionary computation, design and build computational intelligence algorithms.

Course Textbook:

1. S. Russell and P. Norvig. Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach. 3rd edition. Prentice Hall

2. Marsland S. (2015). Machine Learning: An Algorithmic Perspective, (2nd ed.), CRC Press.

SOFE416 Introduction to Parallel Computing

This course includes the following topic: Overview of parallel computer architectures. Various aspects of parallel computing such as: parallel architectures, systems, and algorithms. Modeling and analysis of parallel computations. Focus on solving real problems on parallel machines. Parallel algorithms for solving time-consuming problems.

Course Textbook:

1. Parallel Programming in C with MPI and OpenMP, Michael J. Quinn (Addison-Wesley, 2004).

2. Principles of Concurrent and Distributed Programming, 2nd ed., M. Ben-Ari (Addison-Wesley, 2006).

Basic principles of design, creating a visual vocabulary through 2 and 3 dimensional exercises, design elements and their characteristics, design principles, problems to enhance students’ mental and manual skills, emphasis on creativity, and critical thinking.

Main textbook:

Ching, Francis DK. Architecture: Form, space, and order. John Wiley & Sons, 2014.

Alternative readings:

Bielefeld, Bert, et al. Basics Architectural Design. Birkhäuser, 2013.

Di Mari, Anthony. Conditional Design. An Introduction to Elemental Architecture. Uitgeverij Bis, 2014.

ARCH 103 Graphic Com I

The course content includes; lettering, line types, orthographic projection of forms, introduction to technical drawing in scale; plans, sections and elevations, model making skills.

Main textbook:

Dernie, David. Architectural drawing. Laurence King Publishing, 2010.

Alternative reading:

Zell, Mo. Architectural drawing course. Barrons Educational Series, 2008.

ARCH 105 Freehand Drawing and Presentation Techniques

Freehand drawing and presentation Techniques will enable students to explore sketching, design, colour theory, concept visualization, perspective drawing and basic rendering techniques. Students will be exposed to Architectural presentation techniques along with oral and writing skills that will assist in the communication of their designs in academic/professional environment.

Main textbook:

Lin, Mike W. Drawing and designing with confidence: A step-by-step guide. John Wiley & Sons, 1993.

Alternative readings:

Yanes, Magali Delgado, and Ernest Redondo Domínguez. Freehand drawing for architects and interior designers. WW Norton & Company, 2005.

Ching, Francis DK, and Steven P. Juroszek. Design drawing. John Wiley & Sons, 2010.

ITEC 103 IT for Architecture

This course will aim to Develop skills in basic selection tools and edge refinement to isolate and edit parts of an image. Manipulate layers through ordering, positioning, scaling, rotation, and adjustments. Create composite images that demonstrate advanced selection and layering techniques. Prepare images for Web and print output with appropriate sizing and resolution.

Main textbook:

Sondermann, Horst, and George Morton. Photoshop in architectural graphics. Springer, 2009.

Alternative reading:

Onstott, Scott. Enhancing Architectural Drawings and Models with Photoshop. John Wiley & Sons, 2010.

ENGL 101 Academic English I

Academic English I course covers the following topics: Development of writing and speaking skills; Improvement of Reading skills; English language structures; Lexis; Improvement of Report Connecting critical thinking with language skills; Incorporating technologies to improve English learning; Introduction to model reporting; Finding and searching information sources; References; Proposal and outline; Introduction and report layout; Oral presentation input; Abstract and conclusion.

Main textbook:

Lebeau, I., & Rees, G. (2017). New language leader pre-intermediate coursebook with myenglishlab pack (5th ed.). Essex: Pearson Education Limited.

TURK 101 Turkish I

Turkish I course covers the following topics: Turkish alphabet; Phonetic structure of Turkish language; Plural suffix; Negative and interrogative sentences; Adjectives; Vocabulary and pronunciation; Numbers; Verbs in present simple and continuous tenses; Verb “to be”; Adjectives; Reading; Writing; Speaking; Locative cases; Listening exercises; exercises in pronunciation; Case endings; conversational exercises; Oral presentation.    

Main textbook:

Göksel A., & Kerslake C. (2005). Turkish: a comprehensive grammar. Routledge.

Pollard D., & Pollard A. Ç. (2015). Complete Turkish: Beginner to Intermediate Course, 4th Edition, Teach Yourself.

 

ARCH 102 Basic Design II

This course puts an emphasis on design process, exercises on three dimensional forms, space, function, material, structure, role of context, human dimension and scale, transition from abstract problems to concrete ones.

Main textbook:

Ching, Francis DK. A visual dictionary of architecture. John Wiley & Sons, 2011.

Alternative readings:

Nussbaumer, Linda L. Human factors in the built environment. Bloomsbury Publishing USA, 2018.

Anderson, Jane. Basics architecture 03: Architectural design. Bloomsbury Publishing, 2017.

Di Mari, Anthony. Operative design: a catalogue of spatial verbs. Bis Publishers, 2015.

ARCH 104 Graphic Com II

Advanced graphic communication techniques, developed techniques of 3-D drawing, drawing conventions in different design branches, presentation techniques in various drawing media.

Main textbook:

Ramsey, Charles George. Architectural graphic standards. John Wiley & Sons, 2007.

Alternative reading:

Ching, Francis DK. Architectural graphics. John Wiley & Sons, 2015.

ARCH 106 Intro to Construction

Integration of design thinking with the appropriate structure and technology; history of design technology, structural logic, form, structure and material, sustainable and innovative aspects of design technology.

Main textbook:

Ching, Francis DK, and Mark Mulville. Building construction illustrated. John Wiley & Sons, 2014.

MATH108 Math’s for Designers

The aim of this course is to equip students with mathematical and analytical skills to apply numerical, computational and estimation techniques. Be able to solve algebraic equations and inequalities. Determine functions, domain and range as well as their graphical properties. Be able to distinguish and measure geometric figures and solids. Demonstrate geometric and trigonometric analogy in drawing and designing.

Main textbook:

Bird, John. Basic engineering mathematics. Routledge, 2017.

Alternative readings:

Casey, John. “The First Six Books of the Elements of Euclid.” Ratio 116 (1885): 117.

Burry, Jane, and Mark Burry. The new mathematics of architecture. Thames and Hudson, 2010.

ENGL 102 Academic English II

Academic English II course has the following course content: Writing an opinion paragraph; Practice and production; Vocabulary learning; Identifying text types; Cohesion and instructional texts; Meaning behind the words; Organizing a coherent paragraph; Recognizing definitions in context; Matching main points of paragraphs; How to prepare an outline; How to write a thesis statement; Writing a proposal; Choosing a report topic; Finding sources; Skimming, scanning and note‐taking; Review of genres; Matching genres to tasks; Quoting; Paraphrasing.    

Main Texrtbook:

Lebeau, I., & Rees, G. (2017). New language leader pre-intermediate coursebook with myenglishlab pack (5th ed.). Essex: Pearson Education Limited.

ARCH 201 Architectural Design Studio I

A studio course designed to develop an understanding of form, function and space relations through projects of limited complexity. Minimum structural input not to limit the creativity of students. Emphasis on the overall architectural design process including site, literature survey, functional diagrams and program concepts, human and social factors ergonomics.

Main textbook:

Zevi, Bruno, Milton Gendel, and Joseph A. Barry. “Architecture as Space. How to look at Architecture.” (1957).

Alternative readings:

Sale, Kirkpatrick. Human scale. Coward McCann, 1980.

Parry, Eric. Context: Architecture and the genius of place. John Wiley & Sons, 2015.

Neufert, Ernst, and Peter Neufert. Architects’ data. John Wiley & Sons, 2012.

ARCH 211 Building Construction and Materials I

Tectonics of buildings, which have all types of masonry (brick, stone, timber; with or without tie beams) and some basic types of skeletal structures, and their construction characteristics. All possible construction methods of these structures; infill wall possibilities and their construction methods; construction of possible cladding systems, which are used with these systems; some examples of finishing which are used in these types of buildings.

Main textbook:

Ching, Francis DK, and Mark Mulville. Building construction illustrated. John Wiley & Sons, 2014.

Alternative reading:

Allen, Edward, and Patrick Rand. Architectural detailing: function, constructibility, aesthetics. John Wiley & Sons, 2016.

ARCH 213 Sustainability and Environmental Issues

The core course promises to be an important component in paving the path towards environmentally sensitive architecture education with the purpose of providing architecture students with a sensitivity and understanding of the natural processes that shape our social, cultural and natural environment.

Main textbook:

Williams, Daniel E. Sustainable design: ecology, architecture, and planning. John Wiley & Sons, 2007.

Alternative readings:

Smith, David Lee. Environmental issues for architecture. John Wiley & Sons, 2011.

McDonough, William, and Michael Braungart. Cradle to cradle: Remaking the way we make things. North point press, 2010.

ARCH 215 Building Science I

This course examines the integration of human needs and building functions. According to types of buildings, the required functions are discussed and identified. Human movements (ergonomics) relating the functions within residential buildings are supervised and applied on scaled drawing to recognize the approximate space layout of the building. Together with ergonomics, the building elements, materials and basic instalment methods are discussed.

Main textbook:

Grabow, S., Spreckelmeyer, K., “The Architecture of Use: Aesthetics and Function in Architectural Design 1st Edition”, Routledge, 2014.

 Alternative readings:

Panero, J., Zelnik, M., ‘’Human Dimension & Interior Space: A Source Book of Design Reference Standards’’,   ISBN-10: 0823072711 / ISBN-13: 978-0823072712

ARCH 217 Computer Aided Design I

A course introducing students to the principles of CAD, the theories and methods on which it is founded, and its principal applications in practice – generating, evaluating, modeling, drafting, and rendering design solutions.

Main textbook:

Gindis, Elliot J., and Robert C. Kaebisch. Up and Running with AutoCAD 2018: 2D Drafting and Design. Academic Press, 2017.

Alternative reading:

Palm, Bernd S., and Alf Yarwood. Introduction to AutoCAD 2017: 2D and 3D Design. Routledge, 2016.

ARCH 202 Architectural Design Studio II

A studio course designed to develop an understanding of form, function and space relations through projects of fairly complex functions: A minimum of two-story buildings with simple structures in built environment. The relationship between building and its surrounding is emphasised. The existing surrounding structures are analysed and taken into account for the design process. Additionally, The design is given in a site with considerable topography and the design must address the relationship between different levels in plan and section.

Main textbook:

Ábalos, Iñaki. The good life: a guided visit to the houses of modernity. Park Books, 2017.

Alternative readings:

Bachelard, Gaston. The poetics of space. Penguin Classics, 2014.

Levitt, David. The housing design handbook: A guide to good practice. Routledge, 2012.

Neufert, Ernst, and Peter Neufert. Architects’ data. John Wiley & Sons, 2012.

Ramsey, Charles George. Architectural graphic standards. John Wiley & Sons, 2007

ARCH 212 Building Construction and Materials II

The goal of this course is to provide students with the knowledge and skills required for wide span roof structures (folded plate, space frame, membranes, dome, truss systems etc.), stairs, windows, doors with their own detailing. All kinds of possible construction methods with their special finishing details will be dealt.

Main textbook:

Charleson, Andrew. Structure as architecture: a source book for architects and structural engineers. Routledge, 2014.

Alternative readings:

Allen, Edward, and Patrick Rand. Architectural detailing: function, constructibility, aesthetics. John Wiley & Sons, 2016.

ARCH 214 Building Physics

A course to study the environmental factors influencing architectural design. Issues of climate, lighting and acoustics in relation to energy problems and user comfort. Climatic elements, classification of climates for architectural purposes, thermal process of human body, thermal comfort indexes, thermal process of buildings. Various climate control methods in buildings: thermal, solar, condensation, wi nd control and natural ventilation.

Main textbook:

Baird, George. The architectural expression of environmental control systems. Taylor & Francis, 2003.

Alternative readings:

Baker, Nick, and Koen Steemers. Energy and environment in architecture: a technical design guide. Taylor & Francis, 2003.

Ching, Francis DK, and Ian M. Shapiro. Green building illustrated. John Wiley & Sons, 2014.

ARCH 216 Building Science II

This course examines the integration of human needs and building functions. According to types of buildings, the required functions are discussed and identified. Human movements (ergonomics) relating the functions within commercial buildings (tourism, health, museums, schools, office blocks) are supervised and applied on scaled drawing to recognize the approximate space layout of the building. Together with ergonomics, the building elements, materials and basic instalment methods are discussed.

Main textbook:

Grabow, S., Spreckelmeyer, K., “The Architecture of Use: Aesthetics and Function in Architectural Design 1st Edition”, Routledge, 2014.

Alternative readings:
Panero, J., Zelnik, M., ‘’Human Dimension & Interior Space: A Source Book of Design Reference Standards’,   ISBN-10: 0823072711 / ISBN-13: 978-0823072712

ARCH 218 Computer Aided Design II

A course further increasing students’ capacity in CAD, the theories and methods on which it is founded, and its principal applications in practice – generating, evaluating, modeling, drafting, and rendering design solutions more complex projects.

Main textbook:

Bokmiller, Don. “Mastering Autodesk Revit MEP 2011 (Autodesk Official Training Guides).” (2010).

Alternative readings:

Kirby, Lance, Eddy Krygiel, and Marcus Kim. Mastering Autodesk Revit 2018. John Wiley & Sons, 2017.

ARCH 220 Statics for Architects

The principles of statics, with particular attention to architectural applications.

Main textbook:

Fanella,D., Gerstner, R., ‘Statics for Architects and Architectural Engineers’, ISBN-10: 0442012977

ISBN-13: 978-0442012977

                                                                                      

ARCH 301 Architectural Design Studio III

A studio course designed to provide the student with skills of designing in urban context considering various urban problems. The emphasis on the design concept at a larger scale with particular attention paid on achieving unity within the urban environment. Sensitivity to the existing context by means of historic environment is essential. Requirements include a quality of design, social factors, quality and hierarchy of open and semi-open spaces, street furniture and landscaping, orientation and organization of buildings on site, public-private interface, vehicular and pedestrian circulation, climatic considerations, appropriate construction systems and materials, and regulations.

Main textbook:

Gehl, Jan. Life between buildings: using public space. Island press, 2011.

Alternative readings:

Lynch, Kevin. The image of the city. Vol. 11. MIT press, 1960.

Lang, Jon. Urban design. Routledge, 2006.

Sadik-Khan, Janette. “Urban Street Design Guide.” New York: NACTO (2012).

ARCH 323 Conservation and Restoration I

A course aiming to provide the students of architecture with basic theoretical knowledge and understanding of architectural and cultural heritage. Presentation of appropriate concepts of basic conservation, historic preservation and restoration to help students acquire skills to apply in practice.

Main textbook:

Orbasli, Aylin. Architectural conservation: principles and practice. 2008.

Alternative readings:

Jokilehto, Jukka. History of architectural conservation. Routledge, 2007.

ARCH 325 Structural Behavior I

 Provide the opportunity for students to review and master fundamental concepts of statics and mechanics of materials, and their application to civil engineering and architectural structures. Better understanding of the application of structural analysis to structural engineering practice is also one of the basic learning topics of this course.

Main textbook:

·       Hibbeler R.C.; Structural Analysis, Prentice-Hall,(2006),  ISBN-10: 0136020607

·       ISBN-13: 978-0136020608

ARCH327 Introduction to Interior Design

The course focuses on the relations of human and social environment especially in the interior of the buildings. Design problems of indoor to be examined. Reuse, renovation and re-evaluation of densely circulated indoor spaces of the buildings are discussed focusing on physical and aesthetic performance needs, landscaping, accessibility and needs of the disabled.

Main textbook:

Dodsworth, S.ş ‘The Fundamentals of Interior Design’(2009), ASIN: B01FKU7OCQ

Alternative readings:

Latham, D., ‘Creative Re-use of Buildings’, Donhead,(2013), ISBN-10: 1873394365

ISBN-13: 978-1873394366

ARCH 329 History of Architecture I

First in the series of survey courses on history of world architecture and art, covering the period from pre-historic times to the end of the medieval era, specially designed for Architecture students. Focus, on the theoretical perspective as well as the historical.

Main textbook:

Kostof, Spiro. “A history of architecture: settings and rituals.” New York: Oxford (1995).

Alternative readings:

Moffett, Marian, Michael W. Fazio, and Lawrence Wodehouse. A world history of architecture. Laurence King Publishing, 2003.

Giedion, Sigfried. Space, time and architecture: the growth of a new tradition. Harvard University Press, 1967.

Tafuri, Manfredo, and Giorgio Verrecchia. Theories and history of architecture. London: Granada, 1980.

ARCH 331 Introduction to Urban Design

An introductory course on the basic understanding of urban design issues, in general and within a historic perspective. The course aims to introduce the theories and methods of urban design as a discipline integrated with architecture. The topics of the lectures and discussions: concept of urban space, visual variables determining the quality of urban space, unity as the basic element of urban design, permeability, variety and legibility as main principles of urban design determining the quality of public realm. The course provides students with an introductory yet comprehensive overview of urban design theory and the work of leading urban design theorists encompassing its visual, perceptual and environmental dimensions.

Main textbook:

Kostof, Spiro. The city shaped: Urban patterns and meanings through history. 1991.

Alternative readings:

Mumford, Lewis. The city in history: Its origins, its transformations, and its prospects. Vol. 67. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 1961.

Lynch, Kevin. The image of the city. Vol. 11. MIT press, 1960.

Mahy, Margaret, et al. A new theory of urban design. Vol. 6. Center for Environmental Struc, 1987.

ARCH300 Summer Intermship I

ARCT 200 Summer Training I, covers the “building construction” stage. The student should participate the constructional work on the site and observe the production stages. Those of production stages include the works from the construction schedule and site preparation to the structural completion of the building. Structural completion covers all sub-structural works such as excavation, foundation, retaining walls, ground floor, and super-structural works such as columns, beams, floors, stairs, walls, and roofs. Final finishing stage of the building production is not covered by the training. The duration of the summer training is 30 working days. The student’s work should be supervised by an architect or a structural engineer, and his/her summer training work log book should be approved and signed by the supervisor.

ARCH 302 Arch Design IV

A studio course designed to provide the students with necessary skills to design multi -storey and multipurpose building complex in built-up areas with high complexity in functional organizations; integration of appropriate structural and environmental control systems, materials, building codes and regulations in the metropolitan scale urban context. The emphasis on designing a mixed-use complex is important in considering the themes; repetition, reproduction, variation.

Main textbook:

Sarkisian, Mark. Designing tall buildings: structure as architecture. Routledge, 2016.

Alternative readings:

Eisele, Johann, and Ellen Kloft, eds. High-rise manual: typology and design, construction and technology. Birkhauser, 2003.

Marriage, Guy, ed. Tall: the design and construction of high-rise architecture. Routledge, 2019.

ARCH 324 Conservation & Restoration II

A course aiming to provide the students of architecture with basic knowledge and understanding of architectural and cultural heritage. Presentation of appropriate concepts of basic conservation, historic preservation and restoration to help students acquire skills to apply in practice. This knowledge is applied on a historic project site, working in groups to experience the completion of restoration / conservation in detail.   

Main textbook:

Orbasli, Aylin. Architectural conservation: principles and practice. 2008.

Alternative readings:

Jokilehto, Jukka. History of architectural conservation. Routledge, 2007.

ARCH326 Structural Behavior II

The main purpose of this course is to introduce the concepts of statically determinate forces, displacement calculations including envionemental effects: support movements and temperature effects. This course also introduces the basic techniques required for tanalysing the majority of the structures and elements which most of structures are composed, including beams, frames, arches, trusses and cables Slope deflection and moment distribution theories and influence lines for statically indeterminate structures will be studied.

Main textbook:

Hibbeler R.C.; Structural Analysis, Prentice-Hall, (2006),  ISBN-10: 0136020607

ISBN-13: 978-0136020608

ARCH 328 Landscape Design

This course introduces the interrelated disciplines of landscape architecture, horticulture, planning, and architecture; constitutes a basis for the organisation and design of the functional uses, aesthetic and enjoyable environments; applies artistic and scientific principles to the research, planning, design of built environment; explores existing and natural site conditions and their impact on influencing and shaping the built environment. Creating various types and levels of exterior spaces such as, plazas, streets, neighbourhoods, parks, gardens, square, etc. is also included in the context of the course. Moreoever, the course gives abrief information about history of landscape architecture, ancient gardens and landscapes, and contemporary landscape architecture. The course includes introduction of the elements of landscape design (land, water, vegetation, atmosphere, buildings, roads, pedestrian ways etc.) Landscape architectural technology; grading and drainage, plant identification, site construction, planting design.

Main textbook:

Booth, N., ‘Foundations of Landscape Architecture: Integrating Form and Space Using the Language of Site Design’ (2011) ISBN-13: 978-0470635056, ISBN-10: 0470635053

 

ARCH 330 History of Architecture II

Second one of the courses on the history and theories of architecture, designed in three phases: from renascence to modern architecture, history of modern architecture, postmodern architecture, and contemporary architectural trends.

Main textbook:

Frampton, Kenneth. Modern architecture. Thames and Hudson, 1985.

Alternative readings:

Benevolo, Leonardo. History of modern architecture. Vol. 2. Mit Press, 1977.

ARCH 401 Arch Design V

A studio course designed to provide the student with skills of designing long span structures by considering integrated construction and service systems. The main emphasis is to design buildings with high complexity in function with appropriate structural systems and creating rich architectonic qualities.

Main textbook:

Wilkinson, Chris. Supersheds: the architecture of long-span, large-volume buildings. Butterworth-Heinemann, 2013.

Alternative readings:

Pedersen, Louise, and Jonas Täljsten. “Structure as Architecture.” (2007).

Kushner, Marc. The future of architecture in 100 buildings. Simon and Schuster, 2015.

ARCH 433 Graduation Project Research

In the first part of this course students prepare for the design project and become familiar with the concept of research that is used specifically in the design discipline. In the second part, students prepare concept studies and spatial sketches related to the project and in the last part students submit an avant project which will be continued in ARCH402. The primary purpose is to make students to identify a subject, collect information and data systematically, to analyse and prepare a presentation on the findings. The additional aim of this course is to develop an understanding of conducting research and writing a proper academic paper. Another aim of this course is to develop an understanding of theoretical context of related disciplines such as history, environment, etc., and of transformation of these data into architectural knowledge. Case studies will be undertaken and the understanding of architecture through structural and environmental determinants will be developed.

Main textbook:

Alexander, Christopher. A pattern language: towns, buildings, construction. Oxford university press, 1977.

Alternative readings:

Zumthor, Peter. Thinking the Architecture. AGM, 2003.

Bachelard, Gaston. The poetics of space. Penguin Classics, 2014.

Butler, Jill. Universal principles of design. lynda. com, 2017.

 

ARCH 435 Professional Practice

This course aims to synthesise the occupational knowledge gained in the theoretical disciplines and the actual application. In this manner, students are provided with the awareness and ability of integrating the environmental, spatial, structural, functional and esthetic decisions that are essential for the construction of a building. The course deals with the application drawings of the completed architectural project in detail and the expression and presentation techniques and standards that are applied in harmony with the working stages.

Main textbook:

Gordon, R.P., ‘Integrated Drawing Techniques: Designing Interiors With Hand Sketching, SketchUp, and Photoshop’ (2016), ISBN-13: 978-1628923353, ISBN-10: 1628923350

ARCH 400 Summer Intermship II

Students will work in an interior design or in an architectural office of their choice for a minimum of 30 days Submission of a daily diary and a written report on experience will be required in accordance with the rules and regulations set by the department.

ARCH 402 Graduation Project

A final studio course in which students have started the research of the project topic in ARCH 433. They are expected to develop their designs independently, work from macro to micro scales and with special emphasis on the individual interest areas. Each student is to demonstrate individually a performance that he/she has attained the professional standard required to practice within the rich context of the architectural discipline.

Main textbook:

Alexander, Christopher. A pattern language: towns, buildings, construction. Oxford university press, 1977.

Alternative readings:

Zumthor, Peter. Thinking the Architecture. AGM, 2003.

Bachelard, Gaston. The poetics of space. Penguin Classics, 2014.

Butler, Jill. Universal principles of design. lynda. com, 2017.

ARCH 434 Design Ethics and Legal Issues

This course intends to clarify; What is a design? How is it protected? Intellectual property, artistic property and copyrights. Design law in practice in TRNC, Turkey and EU. Comprehension of ethical issues in design practice, ability to make firm planning and positioning, competence of managing the business’s finances; preparing design contracts and product pricing, proficiency of dealing with human resources; agreement with clients; marketing and outreach.

 

Main textbook:

Chiti, E., Giulio, V., ‘The Administrative Architecture of Financial Integration: Institutional Design, Legal Issues, Perspectives’ (2015),  ISBN-13: 978-8815259240, ISBN-10: 8815259244

Alternative readings:

Unger, Gary. Your Architecture Career: How to Build a Successful Professional Life. Simon and Schuster, 2018.

ARCH436 Cost Estimation

The goal of this course is to enhance the capacities and knowledge of course participants to understand, critically analyse and apply key concepts of life-cycle costs in the design, implementation and evaluation of construction projects.

Main textbook:

Boussabaine, A., Kirkham, R., ‘Whole Life-cycle Costing: Risk and Risk Responses’ (2004), ISBN-13: 978-1405107860, ISBN-10: 1405107863

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P.O. Box 139 Via Mersin 10 – Turkey.

+90 392 600 16 16
[email protected]

Mon – Fri 8:30A.M. – 5:30P.M.

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